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Myths About Drowning

Pool emergencies like drowning occur far too often. Many times this is because the public is misinformed about a lot of aspects of drowning. Simple awareness of drowning myths can be preventative. This blog covers some top drowning myths people have.

Myths About Drowning

Have you ever had a near-drowning experience? Going through such a thing could be so traumatic as to make you fear swimming or being near any body of water for the rest of your life. After all, that feeling of being surrounded by a tremendous pressure that feels like invisible walls closing in on you, constricting your breathing and making you feel like your head is swelling up to the point of exploding is no joke.

All this takes place during a pool emergency that involves being submerged, hence the common notion that drowning could only be possible when you are underwater. However, contrary to what most people think, it does not always occur in the water—and this is where serious problems, which eventually become heartbreaking tragedies, set in. This is one of many myths that not many people are aware of.

In order to be as safe as you can in the pool, it is important to be aware of myths like these. Be in the know and learn what these drowning myths are by going over the details below.

Myth #1: You Can Only Drown While in the Water

Although most cases of drowning take place during a pool emergency, you don't always have to be underwater to be at risk. There is such a phenomenon known as “Secondary Drowning.” Also referred to as Delayed Drowning, it happens following a near-drowning experience.
As it turns out the person eventually develops a pulmonary edema, which is a build-up of fluid in the lungs, after surviving the incident. Just like regular drowning this leads to breathing difficulties that may result to serious brain injury or even death.

Someone can experience similar symptoms during Dry Drowning, which occurs when a person’s airway spasms and closes after breathing in small amounts of water during a struggle.

Because Secondary Drowning and Dry Drowning can sometimes be counteracted with immediate medical observation, it really pays to take the victim to the nearest hospital following the episode. At best, you should always remain vigilant. Hence, it will be in your best interest to take advantage of emergency communications services like a pool phone, which will come in handy during any pool emergency.

Myth 2: It Takes Much Time for an Actual Drowning to Occur

Many people assume that a person must be submerged underwater for a long amount of time before a drowning fatality occurs. In actuality, you don't have to be underwater for a half an hour or more before you stop breathing like some people expect. In fact, drowning can happen in as little as 30 seconds. Because of this, recognition and quick action are of paramount importance. One should always be aware of the people around them and should immediately access a public pool’s emergency pool phone at first signs of distress.

Myth #3: You Won’t Drown if You Know How to Swim

Adults who can swim are just as susceptible to drowning as someone who can't swim. Health-related dangers like shallow water blackout, leg muscle cramps, and heart arrhythmia always have the possibility to occur while swimming and will strike anyone, regardless of age, swimming expertise or gender.

This is why it is always recommended to avoid swimming alone, no matter what your skill level may be. If you run into an issue like this alone, it is impossible for you to get the help that you need by accessing an emergency communications center. Even if the person with you is unable to help themselves, simply having someone with you will allow that other person to access the emergency pool phone at the very least. This can spell the big difference between surviving and perishing.

Myth #4: Drowning Can Be Easily Prevented When a Lifeguard is on Duty

Fact has it that drowning accidents usually occur in guarded pools with a lifeguard nearby. Although these pro-swimmers are tasked to keep an eye on everyone in the water, the number of people they have to attend to is a factor that affects their attentiveness to accidents as they take place.

Small children, in particular, are easily overlooked due to their size. Hence, most public pools post a sign that reminds parents to watch over their kids. This is why most public pools provide access to emergency pool phones in addition to an active lifeguard on duty.

Simply by being aware of these myths, you are more likely to have a safer pool experience. Be sure to be cautious of such myths and to let others around you know about these myths in order to promote a safe swimming environment. To learn more about how Kings III can aid if a drowning or near-drowning occurs, visit www.kingsiii.com.

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Allie Lewis

Posted on April 19 2016

By Allie Lewis, Content Marketing Specialist Kings III

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